Mission

To protect life and property by being prompt, skillful, and caring. Our actions are anchored in the core values of courage, leadership and duty.

The Poudre Fire Authority is committed to saving lives and property as well as being transparent with our operations and budget. The following data and overview is based on performance measurements, programed activities, operational reports, revenue and expenditures that occurred in 2014. Click on links to read more in depth reporting.

Key Performance Outcomes

STRATEGIC GOALS & ACHIEVEMENT (CLICK ON EACH ICON FOR DETAILS)
Accreditation
Fire Code Adoption
Performance Evaluations
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT
IMPROVE SAFETY PROGRAMS
PUBLIC EDUCATOR
EMS SERVICES AGREEMENT
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT/REVENUE ALLOCATION FORMULA
WILDLAND/VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

PFA Service Areas

Type of Calls

By the Numbers

UNIFORMED STAFF: 172
8% are women
Performance standard

First arriving unit to a fire from hello to hello (meaning from Dispatch hello to firefighter’s hello arriving on scene)

National standard: 6:20 minutes 90% of the time

PFA 2014 Actual: 8:30 minutes 90% of the time

(2015 will see this response time drop by over 1 minute because of PFA’s accreditation work)

:
Limiting death & injury:
civilians
0Deaths
3.64injuries per 100,000
firefighters
0Deaths
injuries

Leaders

Gallery

TESTIMONIALS

  • “Thank you and your wonderful team for all of the help in cleaning up the water from our fire sprinkler leak yesterday. You guys are all Great!”

    Tom Kiel
  • “We appreciate everything you do to help us promote safety within the CSU community. Thank you again!”

    Fire & Life Safety Office, CSU
  • “We appreciate your time and service to our community on the 4th of July and on each day of the year. We’re fortunate to have such professional, brave, friendly men and women at Poudre Fire Authority.”

    Donna Newlands
  • “I am writing to thank Company 12 and 2 for their kind and prompt actions to save my horse from a sink hole that developed in my pasture… My sincere thanks for quick response, knowledgeable assisting and compassion.”

    Trudy McElwee
  • “Our family would like to thank you for being a part of our last minute delivery team in order to bring our son, Yusuf, into the world. Even though we never planned to deliver at home, it was comforting to have so many people there to help take care of us.”

    Jamie, Marian, Mayan, & Yusuf
  • “Thank you for coming in to talk to us. I learned so much! One thing I learned is that you should blow out a candle before you leave a room. Also, I learned that fireworks are illegal in Fort Collins and Loveland. Finally, I learned that you should not play with matches because they can start a fire.”

    Coyote Ridge 2nd grader
  • “I feel safer in my home because of your commitment to the safety of the people in our community. You guys are wonderful with big hearts to choose this career of firefighting.”

    Bobbie Bonk

Highlights

Budget

  • total revenue: $27.5M
  • INTERGOVERNMENTAL $24.2M
  • FEES AND CHARGES FOR SERVICES $1.6M
  • CAPITAL FUND REVENUE $1.4M
  • MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE $316K
  • EARNINGS ON INVESTMENTS $73K
  • GRANTS AND NON-CAPITAL PROJECTS $960
  • total expenditures: $25.8M
  • OPERATIONS $17.7M
  • SUPPORT $2.8M
  • ADMINISTRATION $2M
  • COMMUNITY SAFETY SERVICES $1.9M
  • TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES $1M
  • LEASE PURCHASE $234K
  • GRANTS AND NON CAPITAL SERVICES $123K

Stories from 2014

OVERHEAD SPRINKLER

HOME SAVED BY SPRINKLER HEAD

February 11 – 1731 Morningside Drive – A fire broke out in an upstairs utility room, where combustible materials were stored near a water heater. The multi-family unit is protected by an automatic fire sprinkler system. The fire was controlled by a single sprinkler head which limited fire damage to $1,000. Fire sprinklers do make a difference!

GRASS FIRE

6720 NORTH COUNTY ROAD 21

Station 7 units were dispatched to a report of a grass fire; while enroute they noted flames above the tree tops and requested Station 12 units to assist. As Engine 7 proceeded up the driveway it was determined that a structure was involved. The fire was caused by an extension cord used as permanent wiring. The structure was a total loss with damage estimated at $300,000.

FALLEN HIKER

HORSETOOTH MOUNTAIN ROCK

Just after sunrise, crews received a call for help at Horsetooth Mountain Rock where a hiker was reported to have fallen in one of the crevices. Enroute to the call it was learned that the hiker had fallen more than sixty feet off the rock and was injured. This rescue was a collaboration of PFA, Larimer County Parks, Larimer County Search and Rescue, and University Colorado Health.